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Move over millennials, Generation Z is here

February 15, 2016 by Marketing Donut contributor

Move over millennials, Generation Z is here{{}}The millennials are growing up. Young people born in the eighties and nineties have been seen as the first generation to adapt to the "new age". However, these consumers are now entering their thirties and there is a new, younger generation making its mark - Generation Z.

Gen Z youngsters have grown up in the iGeneration - indeed, they have never known life before broadband, mobile phones, apps and social media. But they arguably have a more mature appreciation for culture and ethics compared to their predecessors.

For businesses and marketing professionals, Gen Z presents an interesting demographic to target, as the way they play turns traditional consumer behaviour on its head. The latest research shows that Generation Z are completely turned off by celebrity culture and traditional media, and are more tuned in to peer-to-peer recommendation and online superstars like Zoe Suggs, Tanya Burr, Jim Chapman and Alfie Deyes. For female Generation Z-ers, bloggers are actually cited as the fourth most popular "celebrity" influence.

Understanding Generation Z

Chloe Combi, author of Generation Z, defines this audience as those born between 1995 and 2001 - a subset of Generation Y, really, but a distinct one, whose dates coincide with the spread of home internet connections and mobile phones.

Combi explains: "This iGeneration can't conceive of a world before everyone owned a mobile phone, and instant gratification is their norm; they have it in the palms of their hands within moments, usually for free. This ability to find whatever they're after without the help of intermediaries - such as libraries, shops or teachers - has made them more independent and self-directed than generations before them."

For Generation Z, social media is king. Unsurprisingly, Facebook remains the number one platform, however for Generation Z, Snapchat is the second most popular, with 42% of this audience checking Snapchat at least once a day. For other audiences, Snapchat would barely even get into the top ten. With Snapchat increasingly looking to monetise their service, this is a really interesting platform to keep an eye on if you have a product or service that targets this complex group.

As far as Generation Z is concerned, print media is dead. This is isn't to say they don't pick up the odd magazine or newspaper, however for genuine cut through, online sites, bloggers and vloggers are the media that hold the real power of influence.

Canny consumers

These guys shop around, read review sites and blogs, seek out recommendations and refer constantly to social media. This audience is savvy and is looking for value for money.

For any successful marketing or PR campaign, consumer profiling and understanding how your target audience plays is pivotal. As technology continues to advance at an incredible rate, and as what we know from one generation to the next changes rapidly, understanding consumer behaviour and applying this knowledge to your marketing could make the difference between failure and success.

Generation Z is an interesting demographic and a challenging and exciting audience to engage with. The New York Times has described Gen Z as "the next big thing for market researchers, cultural observers and trend forecasters".

However, by no means are we close to fully understanding this audience, as the nature of Generation Z means they are ever developing and evolving in their behaviour.

Copyright © 2016 Rhianon Williams, associate director at consumer PR agency Escapade PR.

Escapade has produced this infographic to help businesses better understand Generation Z:

Move over millennials, Generation Z is here

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Podcast: expert online marketing tips for 2016

February 08, 2016 by Chloë Thomas

What are the best marketing methods to use in 2016 if you want to boost your online sales results?

In this podcast, I talk to four experts to get their tips on the best marketing strategies for ecommerce retailers in the coming year.

Alex O’Byrne, co-founder of WeMakeWebsites, talks about putting customers first and creating content that attracts and influences them.

Ernest Capbert runs the website Who Buys Your Stuff. He talks about what to do with your marketing after you understand who your customer is, focusing on CRM and social media advertising.

Chris Dawson, co-founder and editor of Tamebay, talks about some of the tools you can use to improve your results on marketplaces such as eBay and Amazon.

Andrew Wilson of Allergy Best Buys reveals how offline marketing can help you sell more products online.

In addition, I share some thoughts on Facebook ads, remarketing and email sign-ups that I hope will be useful. Enjoy the podcast.

Copyright © 2016 Chloe Thomas of eCommerce Masterplan.

How to boost the profit from your existing customer base

February 08, 2016 by Shweta Jhajharia

How to boost the profit from your existing customer base{{}}Many business owners assume marketing is all about lead generation; pulling in new enquiries and gaining new customers.

But this is not the whole picture. Marketing is actually about getting more business. And that includes getting more value out of your existing customer base.

To achieve this you need to be able to identify two customer types. Firstly, you need to know who are your most profitable customers - those that are bringing you high value. This is the absolute gross profit taking into account the volume of sales. Then you need to know who are your "active" customers, those that are engaged with you in some way within a set period of time.

How you approach each of the four main customer segments depends on their profitability and levels of activity. I call this the four Rs - retention, reactivation, reconditioning and reach. Here's how it works:

1. Retention: high profit, active clients

These are the customers who are bringing you high profit and are active. Generally, these will be the 20% of customers that give you 80% of your business. You need to keep these.

Your mindset

Think about retaining them. Have they stopped communicating, are they buying lower margin products or not buying at all?

Strategies

  • Loyalty. Think personal gifts, loyalty programs, rebate points, special deals and freebies. Highlight the higher margin products to prevent them dropping into a lower profit category;
  • Referrals. Decide how, who and when to ask for referrals. You can download a simple 3-step referral system here;
  • Closed-door sales. Take the 15-20% that give you 80% of your business and really making them feel special. This is what customers stick around for and how you create raving fans.

2. Reactivation: high profit, inactive clients

These are the customers who may have once been purchasing at a profitable level, but have started to communicate less with you. Find out why.

Your mindset

You are just reaching out to them, not selling. You want to remind them that you exist, and keep your brand in their thoughts.

Strategies

  • Email sequences. Prepare three emails; make them punchy and straightforward, offering real value to these customers when they re-engage with you. The point is to appear in their inbox and become associated with valuable content. So when their need does arise, you will be the first one they think of;
  • Telephone calls. A phone call can double your reactivation rate. This is a customer care call. Extending a free invitation to an event is a great reason to call and a good reactivation funnel;
  • Find out if something has gone wrong; then rectify the problem.
If you really believe in your product or service, then sales is an education process, and not reaching out is doing your customers a disservice.

3. Reconditioning: low profit, active clients

These are your "comfort zone" clients. You may be afraid to touch them in case they stop buying from you altogether, but the truth is there is more that you can do.

Your mindset

Focus on reconditioning the situation, so the customer is getting more value and is giving you more value in return.

Strategies

  • Change the product mix or options so that they become more valuable to both you and the customer;
  • Increase your prices. Remember most customers are more interested in value than cheap;
  • Negotiate with suppliers to bring the price down; your customer does not undergo any change, but you increase the value they are giving you.

4. Reach: low profit, inactive clients

Don't place your emphasis here but do have a strategy; these customers may become more valuable in the future.

Your mindset

Reach out with minimal effort.

Strategies

  • Automated follow-up. This should not be a hard sell. You are simply regularly showing them you are of value, until they have need for you again;
  • Social media. Post regularly to remind them about you. Use automation software such as Buffer and Hootsuite to save time.

Once you can clearly place your customers into these categories, you will be far better positioned to achieve stability and smart growth.

Copyright © 2016 Shweta Jhajharia, principal coach and founder of The London Coaching Group.

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Like it or not - social media sites are starting to look very similar

February 01, 2016 by Marketing Donut contributor

Like it or not - social media sites are starting to look very similar{{}}Twitter recently made the decision to replace its Favorite button with a Like button giving users a new way to show their appreciation for Tweets.

Of course, Facebook has been using this feature for years. This sudden change at Twitter may have come as a shock to the system for avid social media users, but it's not the first time that something like this has happened. In 2013, taking a leaf out of Twitter's book, Facebook added a panel showing trending hashtags to its homepage.

Social media platforms seem to be slowly blending into one and to prove it, here are three examples of social media features that are now spread across a multitude of platforms.

Likes

To appeal to new users, Twitter has swapped its Favorite feature for a Like feature, symbolised by a heart. According to Twitter, newcomers often found the Favorite feature (with its star symbol) confusing and were unsure what they should use it for.

Crucially for businesses, it's likely that companies that use Twitter will get more Likes than they did Favorites because liking something has a much lower barrier than making it your Favourite. However, this move by Twitter could reduce the number of retweets and these currently generate the most social reach for many firms.

Video

It's hard to ignore the surge in video across all social media channels.

Recently, Facebook introduced an auto-play feature, making it impossible to avoid the viral videos that fill our news feeds. Image-sharing platform Instagram also introduced a 15-second video feature, responding to the micro-video craze established by Vine. Twitter rolled out 30-second videos for tweets and began offering promoted video ads. Even Pinterest unveiled Cinematic Pins, a GIF-like video feature.

Video sharing has even created micro-celebrities, including Cian Twomey, an Irish Facebook user who rose to fame after posting videos of himself impersonating his girlfriend. Cian's Facebook page now has over three million Likes.

Photo tagging

Anyone who has been tagged in an unflattering photo on Facebook will be unhappy to find out that Twitter has also adopted this feature. Rather than listing the names of the people in the tweet, users can now tag them in the photo.

Thankfully, anyone tagged in a photo can amend or delete the tag themselves. The photo will only appear in the original Tweeter's stream, unless tagged users choose to retweet. One thing worth knowing about this feature is that the default setting for private accounts is to not allow any tagging.

Like it or not, it's clear that social media channels are slowly converging on a single set of standards.

Copyright © 2015 Jessica Phillips, account executive at Stone Junction.

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Podcast: online lessons from 2015 and where to go from here

January 28, 2016 by Chloë Thomas

The most successful e-commerce retailers are always learning. But what did we learn in 2015 that can help us move forward in 2016?

The industry has grown up. We turned a corner in 2015. It’s no longer about the shiny tech - those who are succeeding easily are focused on how to best serve their customer and finding the right ways to do this.

In this, my new podcast, I have brought together three top e-commerce experts to review the lessons of 2015.

Chris Dawson, is co-founder and editor of Tamebay and a top expert on marketplaces such as Amazon and eBay. Alex O’Byrne is co-founder of WeMakeWebsites, the UK’s highest rated Shopify web designers. And Andrew Wilson runs his own e-commerce business, Allergy Best Buys.

Tune in and find out how what we all learned in 2015 could help you make more online sales in 2016.

Copyright © 2016 Chloe Thomas of eCommerce Masterplan.

11 ways to make your next presentation a sure-fire success

January 25, 2016 by Andy Bounds

Sales presentations{{}}People ask me loads of questions about presentations. So here are 11 FAQs and answers that can help you transform your presentations.

Q1: How do I engage audiences immediately?

By doing something engaging at the start. For example:

  • Use intriguing words/phrases - "I want to share a secret with you - something that nobody outside this room knows".
  • Use an emotive adjective - "We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity".
  • Use an emotive verb - "I'm really excited to be speaking to you today. Because…"
  • Teach them something - "Did you know…?"
  • Ask a question.
  • Tell a story.

Q2: How do I keep them engaged?

Keep doing engaging things. Think of all the things audiences like - stories, humour, impressive visuals and so on. And ensure you do at least one of them every one to two minutes.

Q3: What's the most important thing about presentations?

There are two - the beginning and the end. The start must engage - use one of the starts suggested in Q1 above, deliver it with lots of energy, have a good title and ensure Slide One looks impressive.

And the end must contain a Call To Action. If it doesn't, your audience won't act. For example, if your last slide says "thank you", they'll merely say "you're welcome" and then leave. If it says "Next steps", there'll be some.

Q4: What's the best way to structure a presentation?

The answer to Q3 showed how to start and end. But what about everything in between? Well, there are two structures that work well.

Firstly, to build a logical argument, use the 4Ps:

  • Position - the world currently looks like X.
  • Problem - and the problem with Position X is…
  • Possibilities - three solutions to this Problem are…
  • Propose - I suggest we do option Y because…

Or use this structure to build buy-in to change:

  • Why it's needed - explain the problems with the current situation.
  • Future vision - the ideal future we want to get to.
  • How we'll get there - everyone's actions, to move from the current situation to the desired future.
  • How we'll overcome our barriers - the things that might get in the way, and how we'll remove them.

Q5: How do I stop people looking at my slides?

One excellent way: don't use them. Or, minimise the words on them, so there's nothing to read. And/or press "B" or "W" to black/white the screen, so they can't see them.

Q6: How do I improve my slides?

The key rule: avoid bullet points. Trust me on this: nobody loves them. There's always a better way to present information. For example, click on the PowerPoint tool SmartArt (in the Insert tab) and you'll see loads of formats - barcharts, flowcharts etc - you can drop your points into. Also, high-quality images work well. Go to Google images, type in your keywords and you'll find hundreds of them.

Q7: How can I make my presentations more interactive?

Ask questions. Obvious, I know. But people rarely think their questions are part of the presentation. Instead, they prepare their slides, and practise their run-through - but they don't script/practise questions. Which means they tend not to ask any. So it isn't interactive.

Also, when thinking of questions, ensure they're thought-provoking - "Which of these five benefits will your customers find most valuable?"; not bland - "Any questions? Anybody? Please? Nobody? OK then..."

Q8: What if I overrun?

Never, ever finish late. Even if the audience seems to love what you're saying, you finishing late makes them late for the next thing in their diary. Trust me on this: they won't ever be grateful to you for this.

Here's a very handy hint: when you need to jump ahead in your slides, simply press the slide number you want to go to and the Return key - you'll jump straight there. The audience won't know you've jumped. Of course, you need to know what the slide numbers are; so, print them out in advance.

Q9: What if the IT doesn't work?

Don't rely on it. Take a paper copy with you, so you have notes to present from.

Q10: How do I remember everything?

Use notes. But put these notes on a hand-held card/piece of paper on your desk, not on the big shiny screen that your audience is looking at. Your notes help only you; the screen helps only them.

Q11: How do I handle my nerves?

Lots of ways, including:

  • Think in advance of the AFTERs - in other words, why your audience - and you - will be better off AFTER the presentation. Will you have helped them save time, be more productive, make better decisions, have less risk? And how will them getting these AFTERs benefit you?
  • Practise. A lot...
  • ...especially the start. Know exactly what your first two or three sentences will be. When they come out OK, the rest tends to follow.
  • Front-load your presentation with your best bits. Saving your best stuff for later isn't as good - they might have switched off if you don't grab them early.
  • Make it shorter and more interactive. It's very daunting to open your mouth thinking "right, I'm the only one in this room who's speaking for the next 60 minutes". It's much easier when you think "right, we're having an interactive chat for the next 20 minutes".

Copyright © 2015 Andy Bounds. Andy is a communications expert, speaker and the author of The Snowball Effect: Communication Techniques to Make You Unstoppable. You can sign up for his free weekly tips.

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