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What every SEO can learn from Drayton Bird

June 14, 2011 by John Straw

Twenty years ago I discovered Drayton Bird and his book Common Sense Direct Marketing.

What I loved most about direct marketing was how developing direct relationships with prospects could be scientific, measurable and very accountable. What you could then do it use a combination acquired knowledge, best practice and creative marketing to maximise on-going response and revenues.

So what has this got to do with you? Paid search experts use these skills every day. They may not know they are using 30-year-old skills, but at least they are using them. The same is true of email marketers.

In my opinion, SEO experts and especially link builders are not aware enough of these skills and how direct marketing can help them beat the competition, and they should be.

What I am suggesting now is that every business should reconnect with Direct Marketing and Drayton Bird now, and here is why.

How do you maximise link-building response rates?

The main method of outreach for a link builder is email. Direct mail professionals will tell you that the ingredients that define what kind of response you’re going to get to your attempt to engage with another individual in order of importance are:

  • List
  • Offer
  • Timing
  • Creative

Let me take each of these in turn and apply them to SEO with a view to increasing your SEO performance.

The list

Generating a list of backlinks from the common and openly available link list providers gives you nothing more than a poorly targeted cold call list capable of generating you a poor response rate to any offer or creative you approach them with.

Why? Because you’ve not been able to clean, profile and segment the data according to criteria that are important to your specific campaign. A process used and perfected by direct mail specialists when most of us reading this were at school.

So if you work through poorly qualified lists of links, STOP. Think about how accurate, segmentable, and responsive those lists really are. Would be better-spent using much better data sources?

The offer

Matching what you want to say to sell to the target audience has a huge impact on conversion. If blogger outreach is your strategy, aren’t you better just talking to bloggers that have a history of linking to sites like yours? If you want to get links from curated resource pages, aren’t you better off talking to webmasters of sites that create and curate resources? You get the idea.

Timing

When I planned press media, Monday was the best day for response and it reduced in a straight lined as the week went on. I’ve seen some email marketing data to suggest a similar thing happens. I also know some brilliant PPC specialists who adjust campaigns by month, week, day and hour to maximise response.

I also know that PR specialists are very time-aware. They think a great deal about when is best to place a story, taking into account the new agenda of the day or week, the seasonality of a specific market, or the editorial agenda of the publication being targeted.

Time is likely to apply to your efforts the question is how and can you use it to maximise each campaign’s effectiveness.

The creative

Finally we get to the creative— whether you’re sending out emails, press releases, or even commenting. What you say and how you say it will matter hugely. It’s of no surprise that Drayton has also written a book on writing sales letters that sell.

What are you saying and is it really going to get the best response rate possible? Are you testing and measuring different techniques for achieving your goals?

Which brings me back to where I started. I think we can all learn from Drayton, and I think we should invest in the best data available to pitch relevant offers at the right time with smart responsive creative. We should then measure the response rate and carry on engaging with our new link partners. All Common Sense Direct Marketing!

John Straw is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and the founder and VP of Business Development of Linkdex.

Want to read more about Drayton Bird?

Drayton is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut. Here are a few of his inspirational articles and blogs:

Have you got an addiction to discounting?

Are you talking to me? Getting the right tone of voice in your customer communication

35 things I have found to be almost always true

How much can you afford to spend on marketing?

Want to get results? - ditch the jargon

Enough about me — let’s talk about you

Who are your competitors? An SEO perspective

June 08, 2011 by John Straw

Black binocularsIn the “old world”, a competitor might be someone who you could readily identify — someone in the local phone book who was on the same page as you or someone who bought ads on the same radio station as you, for the same products and services.

But in a world where customers have swapped the phone book and the local paper for search engines such as Google or Bing, a competitor is someone who ranks more highly than you for the keywords or phrases that define your business.

These competitors might not even be in the same town or country. Of course, you might be lucky. You might have a hyper-local business where you have a monopoly within a certain geographical reach, but even then, you might be missing out on customers who don’t know your business name and are searching for generic phrases.

Understanding how to be at the top of search engines can give you a huge advantage over your competition. The internet is still a relatively immature media and while an increasing number of businesses understand the importance of having a website, not all have understood the importance of natural or organic search, which is probably what brought you here.

In fact, sometimes the largest companies are the slowest to react to new technology, so you may be able to “punch above your weight” and rank more highly in Google and Bing than competition who used to be able to outspend you using traditional advertising methods.

This isn’t new. Sun Tzu, the strategist and warrior said:

“If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.”

He also said:

“Know your enemy and know yourself and you can fight a hundred battles without disaster.”

The phone book of the day is a search engine and understanding your customers and how they find you is a business imperative. If your customers are finding your competitors first, then understanding why your competitors are beating you is the first step to turning around that situation.

 

John Straw is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and the founder and VP of Business Development of Linkdex.

More insight into competitors:

Do you know what your competitors are up to?

Keeping your eyes on the competition

What to do when your competitor lowers their prices

Posted in Online marketing | Tagged SEO, competitors | 3 comments

Word of mouth tops survey of SME marketing

May 09, 2011 by John Straw

Linkdex recently ran a survey in the UK and USA to find out which tools were most important to small and medium-sized businesses when it came to marketing the products and services they sell.

Perhaps to validate the recent increase in online networking platforms, which work on the basis of peer-to-peer recommendation, the most important marketing tool for SME businesses is word of mouth. In fact a massive 81 per cent of the companies polled said that referrals and recommendations were the most important marketing method.

The second most important promotional method for SME organisations was “Google or another search engine”, followed by direct sales teams and PR.

The least important promotional method for the companies surveyed was passing trade.

In terms of trends, 60 per cent said that they would increase spending on email in the next 12 months, 57 per cent will increase spending on social networks and 54 per cent would invest more in SEO or being on the top of search engines.

These new marketing tools will gain at the expense of more “traditional” promotional methods. Thirty per cent of companies surveyed said they would spend less on print advertising and 26 per cent will spend less on directory listings, including the phone book.

The perceptions by companies match the changing ways in which consumers find information about the products and services they want to buy. Evidence suggests that search engines like Google and Bing are the first place people look. As smartphones like the iPhone become more popular and get faster and more powerful, searching on the internet becomes more integrated and immediate.

When these results are backed up by peer recommendation, consumers will trust them more and be more inclined to make a purchase.

It shows that search engine optimisation (SEO) should not be seen as a technical function, but an essential business capability that sits at the heart of the marketing mix. If 54 per cent of businesses plan to spend more on SEO in the next 12 months, then chances are some of those companies will be your competitors.

Making SEO part of your organisation’s workflow and measuring it alongside other key marketing goals can help deliver long term growth. It’s not about search results, but business results.

 

John Straw is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and the founder and VP of Business Development of Linkdex.

 

Keyword-rich domains - I told you so... here come the tears

May 03, 2011 by

Back in February I wrote about the growing fashion to buy up multiple keyword-rich domains — like “big-grey-widgets.com”, “small-grey-widgets.com” etc — in the hope of gaining higher rankings on Google. There was some evidence that this type of domain could indeed rank well, without requiring many inbound links. At the time, though, I cautioned against this approach. Google has a history of acting against such practices by de-emphasising the spammy element and wiping out any benefit gained. Since then, we have seen it do just that with links on article sites.

Now it seems that the big G may indeed be preparing to act against spam in domain names. In March of this year, Google spokesman Matt Cutts slipped the news into one of his popular YouTube videos. You can watch the whole video here.

So if you are one of those who bought up a raft of keyword-enhanced domains, now is the time to prepare for their disappearance. If you’ve being considering doing it, don’t bother.

This recurring pattern of action and reaction by website owners and Google does raise an interesting question. What will happen when every ranking factor that could be spammed, has been spammed, and Google has de-emphasised all of them? Theoretically we should end up pretty much back where we started, except that the whole web will be stuffed with spam.

It’s always tempting to look for the magic bullet that will fire you onto the top page of Google, and the potential rewards are obvious. Forty percent of external traffic to websites comes from search (source: Outbrain), and in the UK over ninety percent of that comes from Google. But to build a sustainable online business with rankings that will stand the test of time, you need to provide good quality site content that is useful to your customers; and invest in building a network of links from good quality and relevant sites.

Anything else is vapour.

Bruce Townsend is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and online marketing specialist at SellerDeck.

 

Read more about SEO here:

What is SEO and why should you be doing it?

Keyword research — a beginner’s guide

Three SEO mistakes you must avoid

Building links to boost your website ranking

What does Google's Panda update mean for your business?

March 28, 2011 by Zabisco Digital

Google is in the process of rolling out its Panda Update, an algorithm change that is set to reduce the value of content farm links. Across the web, you’ll see blogs about why this might be, the changes that will occur in the algorithm and numerous stats and figures documenting the affect the change has already had in the US.

But what do the changes mean to you and me — and, more importantly, to our businesses?

Managing the farm

I’d like to start, as all good explanations should, at the beginning. You’ll no doubt be hearing a lot about “content farms” — essentially, these are websites which seek to gain traffic by seeding content which ranks highly for long tail keywords and search phrases. They typically use advertising as their revenue stream and therefore tend to feature a lot of adverts and not much real substance.

There has long been criticism of Google for the apparent lack of policing over these sites, which essentially “pollute” SERPs (search engine results pages) with poor quality content. The Panda Update intends to reduce the value of these pages, thus pushing them down the rankings and providing better search results for Google’s users.

Great news, wouldn’t you agree? Removing bad content and allowing for good quality content to rank higher — happy days!

And you know your website has good quality content, so you can only benefit – right?

Well, not exactly. Even though you’re probably pretty sure that your content is of a high quality, it’s not just the content farms that will suffer from the changes – nor will they suffer entirely.

Here’s what the algorithm change will mean for you and your business:

1. All pages need to be high quality content

The higher the proportion of high quality pages on your site, the better you will rank. So it’s really important that every page of your site is of the highest standard. That means redirecting, or removing entirely, those poor quality pages and replacing them with well-written, useful content that appeals to your end user.

2. Social validation will be more important than ever

Social validation is the trust we have in content or a brand based on what our friends and networks tell us. Google will be looking at how your content is shared and “liked” to ascertain whether or not people thought it worthy of recommending to their friends. You can help this by making social sharing easier (add social share buttons to your site) and by providing useful content that people will want to pass on to their networks.

3. Article marketing will get creative

The Panda Update means the common practice of seeding content through “content farms” will be devalued and sending out the same press release or article across the web will be pointless. Instead, you and your marketing team will need to seek relationships with influential bloggers, guest blog on relevant sites and generally ensure that every activity you do around link-building provides real benefit to your end user.

So what is “quality content”?

For Google, this will most likely be defined by the following attributes:

  • Good click through rates – after all, if people click it, it must be useful, right?
  • No ads above the fold – you may have noticed that a lot of sites which are based on advertising will advertise to you before you even start scrolling. That just tells Google that they’re only after your traffic for advertising purposes.
  • User engagement – as I mentioned, this will be about social sharing and external links to your pages. So make it sharable!

So do keep an eye on your Analytics — and don’t be afraid to cut the pages that just aren’t performing well.

 

Laura Hampton is a copywriter and online marketer at Zabisco, a digital agency in Nottingham

 

Find out more in our section on SEO — packed with useful information and advice.

The fashion for keyword-rich domains - it will all end in tears

February 21, 2011 by Bruce Townsend

One or two clients have reported to me recently that some of their competitors are achieving good rankings on Google using sites with keyword-rich domains, like “motoring-widgets.com”. URLs like this have been favoured for some time by Bing, and by its predecessor MSN. But more recently they also seem to be delivering good results on Google for some keywords, though by no means for all.

As a result, there seems to be a bit of a rush to buy up and populate such domains. Which is perfectly understandable given the pressure to achieve high rankings on Google, and the benefits of doing so. However, I predict that this latest Google gold rush will end in tears, and much time and effort will be wasted for a little short-term gain.

In the past, site owners have used all sorts of tricks to get sites to the top of Google without actually providing the quality content that Google craves. And Google has been equally proactive in blocking them. The meta keywords tag used to be very popular, until spammers started using it to cheat the search results. Today, Google completely ignores it. The search engine also acted to reduce the effect of so-called Google bombing – driving sites to the top of a search with numerous keyword-rich links. Domain spam is a trick of the same order, and it can be only a matter of time before the big G acts against it.

My daughter and son-in-law recently spent a few days in Naples. They were amazed by the sheer number of illegal street traders operating in the city. They all seemed to have spotters watching out for passing police, and as soon as the police appeared, the traders melted into the side streets.

Spammers are online traders of the same order — always having to move on when the search police turn up and change the game. These people invest huge efforts in a quick sell which works for a few months, after which all their investment goes down the pan, and they have to start again. No doubt some people enjoy this kind of life, living by their wits and constantly trying something new. But if you want to build an online business that delivers a dependable living, then invest in developing a site that has bona fide, worthwhile content, and relationships that lead to good quality links from good quality and reliable sites.

Bruce Townsend is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and online marketing specialist at SellerDeck.

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