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Blog posts tagged SEO

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Blog on a domain vs blog on a website

February 07, 2011 by Alison Davey

It’s a question I am often asked — whether it’s better to have a blog that sits within your main marketing website or to have a blog that sits on a separate domain.

As ever, you need to have a plan, look closely at your objectives, your brand and how your customers want to receive useful information from you and interact with you.

If you have a good website, one that enjoys many visits and conversions to leads, then it is feasible to integrate a blog within your main sales website. Keep it between your own goal posts! This is what marketers call reinforcement and endorsement. Potential customers can see other customers commenting on your products and services and your marketing messages are all in one place.

If, on the other hand, you have a website that needs optimising in the search engines, one that remains static or that you wish to leave as your main sales funnel, you could consider a separate blog domain. A separately hosted blog allows you to extend your marketing messaging further and it can enable you to create freer marketing information — such as blogs that are aimed at educating your audience. This option effectively gives you two websites – and you can register a keyword rich URL which can set you apart from your competition!

 

Alison Davey is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and runs Real Eyes Marketing, a London-based consultancy that specialises in advising small businesses.

Two important factors that influence Google local search results

November 01, 2010 by Daniel Offer

One of the first points to consider, when thinking about creating a business website, is the locality of your target audience. Are you aiming to attract customers from other countries, or are you concentrating solely on the country where your business is located?

There is a very good reason for asking this question and it is something that very few people consider when they develop a website. The domain extension you select and the actual physical location of a web hosting company’s servers can affect whether or not your website will appear in Google’s local search results.

Many small businesses only wish to serve a specific location within a country itself, say a particular town or district. For these businesses, local search can be very influential. Google is placing great importance on local search and it is important to a small business for their website appear within these results. But for this to occur, their website should have the correct domain extension and be hosted on servers that are geographically relevant to their target area.

When deciding if a website is relevant to local search results for a particular location, Google will examine two essential factors.

Has the website got the correct domain extension for that location?

Is the website hosted on servers local to the specific area?

Let’s take a closer look at these two factors:

Domain Extensions

Most web design companies and SEO specialists always insist that a business opts for a .com extension. Search engines do favor this extension in general but not when it comes to local search results. The only exemption here is local searches in the Unites States. In the US, Google automatically defers to .com.

The reason Google considers a website with a country-specific extension more relevant to local search is they assume (with good reason) that the site will likely contain content that is more relevant to search users from the same country. It is that simple.

Web Hosting Server Location

The second important factor is the location of the server a website is hosted on. This is often overlooked by many web designers and SEO companies. It is not always prudent to go for the cheapest reliable web hosting company, without knowing the location of their servers.

This applies to all countries. Many of the popular web hosts have servers that are located in eastern European countries — where property, labour and utilities are cheaper. It is important to do some research before choosing a web host and if you cannot find the information on their site, phone or send them an email. Ask where their servers are located and if they are unresponsive, or dodge the question, the servers are probably not located locally.

There will be perfectly reliable web hosting companies with local servers and the difference in price between these and those with non-local servers will often be negligible. Google does rank server location when they provide local search results, so this is an important choice if you are looking to appear in these results.

There is another factor to consider for any small business that targets a specific local community. Servers located in the same locality as a particular location-based search query can also influence a website’s position in the local search listings.

As with domain extensions, Google presumes the website hosted in the same locality will contain the most relevant content for that area. This is not only country-specific; it can also be area-specific, so bear this in mind when choosing a web-hosting provider.

Google claims that one in five search queries is now a location-based search. At present Google is the prominent search engine and the above two factors do influence how a website is ranked in the local search results. Keep these factors in mind and give your website a local search advantage.

 

Daniel Offer is a partner in the Facebook chat programme Chit Chat for Facebook. 

Ten things to consider before your website goes live

October 07, 2010 by Jessica Hodkinson

Before you launch your new website make sure you get these ten fundamental tips right. This checklist will ensure you are maximising your web presence by having a strong search engine ranking position for targeted keywords in your industry.

1. Cross browser checks

Make sure you have done a thorough check on all popular browsers before your website goes live. The ones to check are IE 7 and 8, Firefox 3, Safari 3, Chrome and Opera.

2. Check that all your links works

Although it may seem like an obvious tip, use a free tool like Xenu Link Sleuth to check for dead links on your website.

3. Create a custom 404 Page

Design a custom 404 page to ensure users aren’t clicking off your site if they come across a dead link. Use this page to give users popular links and a search facility for them to continue to find the right page.

4. Choose the right keywords

Keyword research is highly important when constructing content for your website. Pick two or three word terms as these are easier to work with and are known to have a higher conversion rate than single word terms.

For instant traffic to your website, use Google Adwords Sponsored Links. These ads are typically displayed across the top in a beige colour and down the right hand side of the search results. However, be aware that your campaign may cost you a lot of money if incorrectly set up and monitored.

Add a blog to your website but don’t use your blog to only talk about your products, instead discuss non-commercial topics which will help to drive traffic to your website i.e. a guide to buying the right widgets.

5. Make sure your title tag includes keywords

Make sure each page of your website has a unique <title> tag and that this tag starts with the keyword targeted to this page. For instance:

<title>Metal Widgets | Buy Aluminium, Brass and Steel Widgets for sale at Bobs Engineering</title>

In this example, the title tag has additional information such as different types of metal and selling messages like “for sale”. Also notice the company name is at the end.

6. Consider your meta description for high CTR

To attract a high number of visitors via Google, consider your meta description tags. Use this tag to display your unique selling point such as:

“Free next day delivery on our award-winning Leather Sofa – guaranteed to be the lowest price sofas for sale online”

7. Proofread and check your site

Get your family and friends to check all details on your website before it goes live – this includes phone numbers, email addresses, addresses and names. Ensure all your place-holer text has been removed!

Make sure each page of your website contains at least 50 words of exclusive content. Pay particular attention to product details and category descriptions and ensure you include the target keyword for that page.

Don’t be tempted to copy text from other people’s website or catalogues as this will incur a duplicate content penalty from Google. You can test how unique your content is for free at http://www.copyscape.com/.

8. Use a sitemap and submit to Google Webmaster tools

Generate an XML Sitemap and submit it to the Webmaster tools of Google, Bing and Yahoo. Using GWT, you’re able to diagnose any crawl issues with your website and get statistics on which pages on your site are broken and how many pages on Google have been indexed when the site is launched.

9. Use Google Analytics

To analyse and monitor the success of your website, set up a Google Analytics account. This way you can measure the traffic to your website and keep an eye on visitor retention. It is also a useful tool for checking the success of your keywords and highlights what people are searching for.

10. Contact authority sites for valuable links

Once your website is launched, the next stage to improving your ranking for a particular keyword is to have a significant number of links to your website using your target term as the clickable text link. This can take a lot of time and effort so it can be beneficial to get a professional SEO team to help you with this.

These tips were brought to you by Leeds SEO Company Blueclaw.

A curious list of search engine queries

January 06, 2010 by James Ainsworth

Since we launched our small business resource website in April many people have found the Marketing Donut through typing various queries into search engines. When we looked under the bonnet of our website, we found some more curious examples of the search terms people have entered. Either accidentally or intentionally, people found their way to the Marketing Donut by searching the terms from the following list:

  • berlino bear
  • coffin made from banana leaves
  • growing a donut
  • unusual event in a zoo
  • what is
  • "manchester airport unique selling point"
  • Mail shooting customers
  • marketing plan flavoured yoghurt
  • tweet heart
  • typical complaints from customers at the vets
  • "sir richard branson" + hoax
  • marketing drugs
  • Josef Fritzl autobiography wh smith apologizes
  • image consultant for over 35s
  • po box doesn't look professional
  • goth Warwickshire

If you would like to know more about search engine marketing and optimisation, we have some handy resources available.

 

Web traffic, it’s as easy as one, two, three …

November 18, 2009 by Mark Sinclair

Getting more people to your website is obviously going to do great things for your business. You don’t need to be IT savvy or an SEO geek to improve how you get found online. With the growth of social media, you can gain more attention with less effort and slowly but surely get your business name to the front page of Google.

A key point made in this video is that you need to focus on tracking results so that you can refine what you are doing to get better results.  How have you managed to track your web presence and growth? 

 

Why Your Definition of Spam Doesn't Matter: A Lesson in Social Media Marketing

August 06, 2009 by

What is spam?

It doesn't matter. Definitions or legal views of what constitutes spam don't matter. Your personal interpretation of spam doesn't matter. What does matter is people's reaction to your marketing activities. Because the moment someone calls your marketing 'spam' it becomes spam.

Can the Spam to Spare the Ham

Your email campaign or brilliant Twitter strategy may be legal, legitimate marketing efforts with every opt-in box ticked, but if people start shouting 'spam!' then you've got a problem. Even if you can rightly argue that you're on the right side of spam laws, you shouldn't waste your breath. Apologise, stop the campaign and come back with something less offensive.

An Example

A Brighton-based business recently discovered how this principle works in reality. They were using Twitter to push a new web directory, when people starting crying 'spam!'. The company argued that they were using Twitter reasonably to promote their directory. No, argued many in the local Twitter community, they were abusing Twitter and generating spam. Enough people flagged them as spam and within days their account was suspended. A brilliant social media campaign? No, it was a disaster. They managed to alienate the very people they should have been trying to woo.

The Lesson?

Listen to your audience. If you hear even a whisper of 'spam' then be wary. Be prepared to change your approach in the face of criticism. And don't bother arguing the definition of spam. If someone feels that you're spamming them then you are. So stop.

Displaying 13 to 18 of 23 results

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