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Blog posts tagged Exhibition(s)

What’s the best location for your exhibition stand?

September 22, 2014 by Richard Edwards

What’s the best location for your exhibition stand?{{}}If you want to get the most form your exhibition stand then you need to choose the right location and layout.

1. Get a floor plan

If possible, it is a good idea to gather any previous years’ floor plans for the exhibition. You can then identify patterns, such as certain industries grouping together, or recurring refreshment areas that will help to guarantee heavy footfall.

2. Side, corner or island?

Each of these locations has benefits and drawbacks. Most stands at an exhibition are at the sides, making it easy to design a reusable stand for this space. However, this position can make it more difficult to get noticed as other stands will inevitably block the view. Corner spaces can help deliver a greater footfall to your exhibition stand. Island stands can be very effective in delivering footfall. However, you will need to anticipate the main entry point so you can angle branding and other features to greet new visitors.

3. Neighbours

Your neighbours will have an impact on you. If all of your neighbours are from the same industry this might detract from your stand, overwhelm visitors and create “industry swamp”. Being near an industry leader can help attract people to visit your stand though. Being near a complementary stand can also have benefits as you can both refer visitors to each other’s stands.

4. Your own space

If you have multiple arms to your business, it could be worth allocating each division its own exhibition space in different areas of the exhibition. This can create greater brand awareness. In addition, by separating the different arms of your business you can position each in locations that will attract the most relevant footfall.

5. Don’t limit your creativity

What are your stand’s limitations — position, power supply, height and floor space? The only way to stand out is to get creative within these limitations — not to limit your creativity.

When BT came to us for an exhibition stand that could fit within a very tight floor space and with limited power supply, we looked at what could be used in the design — height and soft light. We designed and built a canopy of stretched material, which refracted low-wattage lighting to create a spectacular result visible all the way from the exhibition entrance.

The key is planning. Think about what you want to achieve and who you want to attract. Above all, design around your limitations — don’t give in to them.

Copyright © 2014 Richard Edwards, director, Quatreus.

Ten ways to attract visitors to your exhibition stand

August 28, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

Ten ways to attract visitors to your exhibition stand{{}}Attracting large numbers of visitors to your stand at an exhibition is a two-stage process — including activities pre-event and during the event. Here are ten ways to maximise visitor numbers:

1. Start early

Inform visitors of your presence about a month before the exhibition and give them a flavour of what you’re showcasing. A good option is advertising or getting an editorial in the show guide as this usually goes out to all pre-registered visitors beforehand. There will also be printed copies when people arrive at the show. A lot of visitors plan their day over a coffee using the guide before they start roaming.

2. Keep in touch

Another great way to flag up your presence at a show is by sending email or direct mail to your client and prospect database. Social media is also a quick and easy way to amplify the message — think LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, depending on your sector.

3. Put on a good show

A successful exhibition stand is a mixture of creativity, functionality and activity. Ergonomics are important — is the stand open and welcoming, does it flow correctly, is it well-designed? A good stand should look architecturally interesting and include the use of different materials, finishes, lighting and colours.

4. Content is key

What is your message and is it illustrated in your design and content? Rather than just showing graphics or brochures on your stand, digital tools such as quizzes, surveys, games and animations help visitors feel engaged and make your presence far more memorable.

5. Use incentives

Offer visitors an incentive to part with their data; for example, a prize for taking part, an interesting giveaway (tied in with the theme) or a draw for a bigger prize post-show. This also keeps the exhibitor-visitor dialogue going after the event. By posting event scrapbooks on sites such as Storify and Pinterest, and using your blog, you can broadcast key messages to visitors as well as to prospects that couldn’t make the show.

6. Maximise your budget

If you’re on a smaller budget you need to maximise it. If you don’t exhibit often you may not get value out of purchasing a stand and would be better off hiring it. Hired stands can still be creative and bespoke and they are cheaper so you can test the water. Small spaces can deliver just as well as larger ones. Use the height above a stand for rigging a banner or halo.

7. Measure your results

Make sure you can track the success of what you do so you can measure return on investment. If you’re going to invest in exhibiting, you need to measure your results against your sales lead and conversion objectives.

8. What about freebies?

There are good freebies and bad freebies. Bad freebies for me are generic items — such as pens, mugs, mouse mats that don’t tie in with anything you’re doing. Good freebies have relevance, longevity and a purpose. We recently did some customised Toblerone bars — everyone likes chocolate, but they tied in with the “angled” theme on our stand. We also combined this with an augmented reality wrapper that played a video from an app. Good freebies don’t have to cost the earth; but if you can’t think of anything original, then freebies won’t be missed.

9. Look professional

Staff in branded tops can look neat and yet informal. Being relaxed but professional is key. Visitors don’t want to feel intimidated — if you’re suited and booted, it helps to drop the tie.

10. Brief your staff

No visitor wants an over-zealous salesman in their face as soon as they’ve walked on to the stand. Establish eye contact first, smile and ask them how they’re finding the show. Don’t go for the hard sell straight away — you need to find out why they’re visiting. But remember you are there to generate leads and you won’t do that if you’re ignoring everyone, are on your mobile, talking to your colleagues or taking a break.

Copyright © Samantha Thomsett, head of marketing at exhibition stand and display specialists, Nimlok.

Want to drum up sales? Get exhibiting

January 08, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

Want to drum up sales? Get exhibiting/Drum-set with sticks{{}}According to the latest research, 86% of business directors agree that exhibitions are the second most effective means of generating sales leads after a company’s own website.

This finding may surprise you when you consider the array of other alternative channels available to companies. So why are exhibitions still such a successful means of drumming up business?

One reason why every company, regardless of size, should get showy is due to the unique captured target audience you can gain from attending a show. At trade exhibitions you can be certain of reaching a large portion of your target audience.

Meeting customers that want to buy

Most people who make the effort to attend exhibitions up and down the country aren’t there to window shop. If they’re taking the time to visit a particular show then these are real potential customers with real money to spend. The fact that you can access a relevant, filtered audience is the key to trade exhibitions and is a great reason why businesses should exhibit.

Another big gain is brand affinity with your customers. In a world where everybody is connected by computers, brand differentiation often gets lost in translation.

By giving your target audience the chance to physically engage with your brand in an environment that is primarily in your control, you can gain a serious upper hand on your competitors. When done in the right way to suit your brand, this can be a great way to stay in people’s minds.

Even though it can seem an expensive option, in the long term an effective exhibition stand can be a much more economical investment than other ways of trying to reach your audience and it can deliver real results.

It’s definitely worth considering taking the time and effort to get yourself and your business in front of your target audience. Just make sure of a firm handshake at the end of it!

Rick Hewitt is marketing and graphics assistant at Envisage.

How to network before an event

November 27, 2013 by Luan Wise

How to network before an event/hand holding network{{}}In these times of web 2.0 and online social networking, it’s all too easy to forget the value of meeting face-to-face.

Trade shows, conferences and seminars are all great networking opportunities — they can help you raise your profile, meet new customers, connect with suppliers and more.

Networking events are sometimes viewed as a bit of a skive, but as anyone who attends them knows, they can be hard work — and, used well, this time out of the office can be invaluable to your business.

Online tools have made face-to-face networking less stressful and more time efficient, and a little online research can bypass that awkward first stage of a meeting.

This research can include checking the website to see who’s exhibiting and taking time to read any pre-event emails and literature to devise a plan of attack.

You may have the chance to catch up with existing suppliers or meet new ones. Contacting them to arrange a time to talk can help you get the most out of your visit — alternatively, arrange a post-event follow-up if you need more time.

Try to find out who else will be attending the event. Perhaps there’s a prospect you’ve been trying to contact or an ex-colleague you’d like to share industry info with.

Here are a few ways you can find this information.

LinkedIn

Though there’s no longer a dedicated application for events, there are still ways to spot who might be attending. Check status updates to see if anyone has mentioned the event. Update your own status and invite your connections to respond.

Many large events now have a dedicated LinkedIn group, where you can find people who share your interest. Identify group members who are existing connections, read the latest posts, start a discussion about meeting up (don’t make it too much of a sales pitch) or send individual messages to people.

Eventbrite

Many event organisers use Eventbrite (embedded in their own website) as a registration tool and to take payment. You can also use it to search for events in your industry or those happening locally.

Look for a list of those who have registered, search for them on LinkedIn and make contact before the event.

Twitter

As well as following event organisers on Twitter who may be tweeting in the run up to an event, many events have a hashtag you can follow to find out what exhibitors are up to and who else is planning to visit.

Again, this gives you the opportunity to check out profiles and connect before the event. Use the event hashtag to tweet that you’ll be attending, and ask if anyone wants to meet up. It’s that easy!

On the day

Use tools such as Foursquare or Facebook to check in to the event, so exhibitors and other delegates can find you. Tweet to say you’ve just enjoyed a particular presentation, or that you‘re about to take a coffee break and you’re looking forward to chatting to other delegates.

And finally…

So, you did your preparation, made some valuable contacts and had a great time — remember to carry on networking and follow up everyone you met, as well as those you may have missed. Explore the event hashtag stream and check out the LinkedIn group. A quick “great to meet you/see you again” or “sorry I missed you” note will keep the door open for future conversation.

Luan Wise is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and is a freelance marketing consultant.

How to make an exhibition of yourself

May 07, 2013 by Mike Southon

How to make an exhibition of yourself/people walking on red carpet{{}}The first buds of spring also herald the beginning of the conference and exhibition season, with many companies wasting a small fortune trying to promote themselves to uninterested visitors.

It is not cheap to exhibit at a trade show. The stand space itself is expensive, and then there is the cost of building the stand, developing new marketing materials, plus the considerable staff time involved in just being there.

I often find myself speaking at exhibitions when the organiser's business model is to sell stand space on the premise that thousands of visitors will be attracted to the event by the top quality keynotes and free workshops on offer.

When I visit the stands, I receive many complaints about the aggressive sales techniques of people selling exhibition space. They complain that these commission-only salespeople provide inflated estimates of the likely visitor numbers and can be very persistent and unpleasant.

My advice to any potential exhibitor is to leave any decision to the last minute, and always to offer to pay only a small percentage of what is quoted on the organiser's rate card.

Guess the business

But if you do decide to exhibit, it is always good practice to make the sales messages on your stand as obvious as possible. An interesting exercise is to walk down an aisle at a trade show, trying to guess what the exhibitor does just by looking at their stand.

It is clear that many of the stands have been designed by amateurs trying to do their own marketing. Alternatively, they have engaged a marketing agency whose brilliant idea is to deliberately make the messages of the company as opaque as possible. They argue that this will generate curiosity in the casual observer, encouraging them into visiting your stand to find out more. Sadly, this rarely happens in the real world.

People who attend trade shows are looking for someone to solve their problems or meet their needs. If you clearly state those problems and needs and then explain how you can address them, you stand a good chance of attracting a potential customer.

Your stand personnel

There is also one last hurdle before your company achieves an acceptable return on its investment in stand space, and that is the hapless people on the stand itself. Working at trade shows is a dismal and tiring process. The people you do want to attract will studiously avoid eye contact, while those who deliberately engage your attention are often time-wasters, competitors or students, often with poor social skills.

In my experience, very little business is gained from people causally wandering onto your stand; the key to success at a trade show is in the pre-event preparation. Experienced trade show exhibitors train their staff in good stand technique and do most of their work in advance of the event, contacting potential customers to make specific appointments.

Any spare time at the show is used in scanning the other stands, eyeing up the competition and looking for new leads.

If you do spot a potential customer working on another trade show stand, it is poor etiquette to try and engage them in a sales conversation there and then. They want to sell to other people, not listen to your sales pitch. You should just ask for the name of the key decision-maker for contact after the event, and take as much of their sales literature as possible for your pre-meeting research.

You can also drop into the keynotes, seminars and workshops and learn something new. If they have one on how to exhibit successfully at a trade show, then that would definitely be worth a visit.

Copyright ©Mike Southon 2012. All rights reserved. Not to be reproduced without permission in writing. Mike Southon is the co-author of The Beermat Entrepreneur and a business speaker.

 

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