Expose yourself properly: No story means no PR

By: Emily Cagle (@EmilyCagle)

Date: 8 September 2009

So, you’ve agreed to sponsor an exciting initiative.

 

You can now expect a logo or mention on the sponsored party’s website, marketing materials and at the event, and you might even get a mention in press coverage. Fantastic exposure.

 

At this point, you might start seeking coverage in your own industry’s ‘trade publications’, but here’s a warning:

 

In most cases, the media simply don't view sponsorships themselves as newsworthy.

 

For example, if you’re a legal firm sponsoring a craft festival, the legal press is very unlikely to cover it. There’s simply no story there, and no amount of padding will change that.

 

In fact, unless you have hard evidence that the sponsorship generated such success for your business that others in your industry could learn from it, the media probably won’t touch it. Worse still, if you try to PR it anyway, you risk causing long-term damage.

 

Editors receive literally hundreds of press releases a day, and a weak story could have them reaching for the delete key for every future press release you put out – even ones that deserve attention.

  

If you want to bring your company's achievements into the spotlight, by all means engage a PR professional, but keep in mind that while a well thought out approach may take longer to get up and running, it will yield much better results in the long term.

 

Of course, with a crack team of creatives and an unlimited budget, it could be argued that anything is possible, but as a rule: no story = no PR.