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Do you need a new approach to selling?

June 20, 2016 by Andy Bounds

Do you need a new approach to selling?{{}}Today, you'll make lots of sales. You might be selling:

  • Products or services to your customers;
  • A proposal to a new prospect;
  • The idea to your children that it's time to go to bed. Right now.

But, despite its importance, many of us don't like the thought of selling. It's almost a dirty word.

Perhaps this is because we've all been on the receiving end of an idiot salesperson's pushiness. But there's something else: all the words to do with selling - selling, proposing, pitching, influencing, convincing, persuading - are from the sellers' point of view.

So sellers tend to feel that selling is something you do to someone. And that means the recipient can therefore often feel they're having something done to them.

But selling shouldn't be like that. It isn't one-way; it's a joint thing. You and your customer are agreeing to work together to do what you propose, whether that be to:

  • Buy something;
  • Accept your proposal;
  • Go to bed.

So, when you sell, be joint. The easiest way to do this is to start with their objectives and then show how your suggestion fits with them. Keep it short and simple - your preparation needs just two steps:

  • Find their objectives (the best way to do this is ask them);
  • Work out how your suggestion (your "sale") will help achieve them.

Do it this way and you both benefit. You both value it; and you both enjoy it. And, since you're both happy, selling has become a joint thing.

Copyright © 2016 Andy Bounds, communications expert, speaker and the author of The Snowball Effect: Communication Techniques to Make You Unstoppable. You can sign up for his free weekly tips. This blog first appeared here.

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Posted in Sales | Tagged selling, sales | 0 comments

Three ways to lose a sale

October 22, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

Three ways to lose a sale{{}}Businesses spend a lot of time and money on marketing with the aim of attracting more clients and selling more products.

So why do so many of them make it so hard for people to buy? Are you guilty of ensuring a prospect won’t buy from you?

These are the three most common reasons a potential client won’t buy from you:

Your proposition is unclear

What business are you in, where is your expertise and why should I work with you? Are you offering tangential products or services that make you look unfocused or desperate for money?

When a potential client visits your website or reads your personal profile what does it say about you? Are you expert in one thing or do you appear a master of none?

Breaking promises

How many times have you heard the sentence “I will get XYZ to call you back” or “I will get that in the post for you” and nothing happens?

These minor irritations really can damage your business. Not only do you annoy a customer that wants to do business with you, but you also create a story for the complainer to share with their friends (your potential future clients).

Annoy your potential customers and you are wasting their time and losing yourself a future client.

Making it too difficult to pay

This is the biggest sin of all. They want to spend money with you – help them, don’t hinder them.

Do you have clear instructions on how to buy or how to pay? Do you have payment options like Paypal, WorldPay, Sage, send a cheque, make a bank transfer or any other appropriate options for your target client? Older clients often prefer to call a human and make a payment by phone. What about payment options such as staged payments for higher value goods or monthly direct debits?

Whatever business you are in, getting money from clients quickly and easily is crucial to the lifeblood of your business.

The solution is simple; read your website and marketing material as if you were a customer. How easy is it to understand, is it jargon free, consistent and clear? Once the client knows what you do, can they place an order or ask a question easily?

If not, you may find your competitors are helping themselves to money from your clients’ purses.

Copyright © 2014 Vicki Wusche, property investor and author.

What are your customers really buying?

November 28, 2013 by Andy Bounds

What are your customers really buying?/buy on keyboard{{}}When I’m in London, I travel between meetings on the back of a motorbike taxi. I use them because the journey times are quicker and more predictable than my other options. I don’t choose them because “it’s a motorbike”.

Also, my company chose our IT service providers because they could free up our time; not because “we do IT”.

And we selected our accountant because he could help us grow our business; not because “he is an accountant”.

You see, when we buy things, we aren’t interested in the things. Instead, we’re interested in what they give us. Or, as I call it, the afters — why we’re better-off after buying.

Weirdly, we often don’t realise we want these afters. For example, I imagine you recently bought a newspaper, thinking you wanted a newspaper. You didn’t. You wanted the news. Glasses? Better sight. Toothpaste? Clean teeth.

Smart companies use afters to persuade us to buy. For instance, Kodak doesn’t sell by discussing their photographs; they talk about preserving our memories. Disney doesn’t sell by focusing on their cartoons. They talk about making our dreams come true.

So when you want people to buy-in to your messages, what do you focus on? Your ideas? Initiatives? Proposals? Research? Yourself?

Or, do you focus on why others will be better off afterwards? The time you save them. Or the costs. Or the hassle. The fact you reduce their stress, grow their business, help them look good to their boss… Now, those are great reasons to buy-in.

So, engage others instantly by beginning with their afters. This can be hard to do — after all, you are passionate about what you do. But I would never have chosen a motorbike taxi if some motorbike enthusiasts had spent ages telling me about their motorbikes.

People will never buy into your content unless their afters are crystal clear. So next time you’re looking for quick buy-in, start by explaining why the other person will be better off afterwards.

Andy Bounds is a communications expert, speaker and the author of The Snowball Effect: Communication Techniques to Make You Unstoppable. You can sign up for his free weekly tips here.

You can read more about Andy’s approach to sales here: No more fears — selling made easy

Posted in Sales | Tagged selling, sell, sales | 0 comments

How a Scotsman can help you qualify a prospect

May 31, 2011 by Craig McKenna

Qualifying a prospect is probably one of the most important elements of selling if you are a small business. The time you can save by not trying to sell to prospects who ultimately never would have bought anyhow is invaluable, as well as the mental advantage that can be gained by being able to focus only on the right prospects.

The eight key stages that should be followed can be remembered easily using the term SCOTSMAN.

(S) Solution — Have you clarified if your prospect understands what it is that you wish to sell them. What is your solution and why will it work for them?

(C) Competition — Have you an awareness of whether there is anyone competing with you to sell to your prospect or for the money they may use to buy from you? Your competition could be internal as well as external.

(O) Objective — Have you a clear understanding on what your client is looking for, what are they in the market for? What is important to them now and in the future? Do you improve their services or processes, or do you save them money?

(T) Timescales — Have you clarified what timescale the prospect is working to? Can you deliver within that timescale? Does the timescale work for you? Is there a timing factor that could be used in your favour, for example a financial year end?

(S) Size — Is the potential size of the deal worth the effort going to be needed to win the business? Have you a clear picture on what size the deal will be? Is it smaller than ideal but could open doors? Is it too big and may have a detrimental impact on your business?

(M) Money — Does the prospect have the money in their budget to pay for your solution? If they don’t have a budget, can they find the money or do you need to consider walking away?

(A) Authority — Are you speaking to the decision maker? The person who ultimately will sign the cheque? Are they even aware that you are speaking to their company? It is no longer imperative to deal with just the decision maker, there is a value in dealing with another contact within the business but very few pieces of business are completed without the main authority signing off on it.

(N) Need — Does the prospect actually need your solution? Very few deals happen in the current climate without a clear need. There are many reasons why they may need your solution and it is key that you find out which one is relevant and focus on it.

If you can answer all of the questions in a positive manner, then your chances of closing the deal are significantly higher than if you can’t. Very few deals will actually happen if one or more of these eight key stages are missing, and the time you may waste on chasing shadows is valuable.

It can be easy to get sucked into thinking that every deal will happen, and there is also a sort of comfort that some small businesses value in having a large pipeline that “could” close but I would encourage you to qualify properly and allow yourself to focus only the deals that have a chance. You are better off closing three out of five good prospects than two out of ten prospects as your focus was stretched thin.

 

Craig McKenna is a managing partner at The Growth Academy.

How to sell when you are "crazy busy"

May 24, 2011 by Craig McKenna

Busy woman with phones

All business owners get busy — it comes with the territory and we all have to make choices on what we prioritise and what we don’t. Human nature tends to encourage us to prioritise the tasks that we like or are stronger at, and this, more often than not, does not include selling.

To achieve sustainable growth and drive a business forward it is essential that we have a consistent approach to sales. How do we ensure that we continue to sell effectively during the periods when we are flat out and crazy busy?

1. Qualify targets properly

When we are busy it is vital that we don’t waste time chasing shadows or lost causes and the best way to achieve this is by qualifying targets properly and only chasing the targets that could close.

2. Choose meetings carefully

There is a real value in meeting potential clients face to face and I am a huge fan of ensuring that the personal touch is always given precedent over email and phone but we have to be careful we don’t over do it. When you factor in prep, travel and the actual face to face time, meetings cut heavily into your diary. Pause and think — do you really need to attend a meeting to move the deal forward? Would a call be more appropriate? Does the meeting even need an hour?

3. Network efficiently

Networking is an essential part of the majority of small business sales strategies. It is important and it needs to be done properly, but plan it. Work out how much time you can designate to networking and work a plan around that. If you can only attend one group, attend it properly and make sure you get value from it. Don’t try and attend a lot of groups sporadically, it won’t work. You need continuity to get benefit from any networking and if not done right, it is just time wasted.

4. Work to properly set targets

If we have properly set targets and work towards them, it becomes a lot easier to focus our selling and avoid wasting time on the wrong activities. Too often small businesses either don’t have targets or don’t work towards them effectively and this can result in a lot of wasted time. If you know you are close to achieving a target or you are miles away it helps you make the right decisions on which meetings to take and what other activity you need to make time for.

5. Always maintain activity

No matter how busy we get we cannot afford to let activity levels drop to zero! It is a lot easier to keep activity going than it is to restart it. Too many businesses only sell when they have very little or no business at all and then they find it difficult. No matter how busy you get, your selling must keep ticking over. Identify your key targets and work on them, whether you choose 40 or 200, it is up to you, make a call on the number and get to work on them.

 

Craig McKenna is a managing partner at The Growth Academy.  

Posted in Sales | Tagged selling, sales | 0 comments

Are you selling your customers what they want or what they need?

May 17, 2011 by Fiona Humberstone

It’s a simple question really. Many of us are passionate about selling products and/or services that we wholeheartedly believe in. Because, let’s face it, if we aren’t passionate about our own product then we can’t expect our customers to be. But selling someone something they need but don’t particularly want can be incredibly difficult.

Selling someone a product or service they want is often just a matter of closing the deal. What many people fail to realise is that it’s incredibly difficult — perhaps nigh on impossible, to sell someone something they might need, but don’t think they want.

Occasionally, I’ll meet a business owner struggling to make their business model work. And often, the root cause lies in the fact that they’re on a crusade to change the world. They believe so passionately in their business, product or service that they are convinced everyone else should too.

They look to the branding and the marketing to solve the problem. They revisit their sales process. If they’re not careful they can embark on incredibly expensive campaigns that result in very little. Why? Because they’ve failed to grasp that their customers don’t want what they’re selling.

They might need it. But they don’t want it. Nightmare.

Fiona Humberstone is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and runs her own creative consultancy.

Posted in Sales | Tagged selling, sales, customer needs | 0 comments

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