Courtesy navigation

Blog posts tagged sell

What are your customers really buying?

November 28, 2013 by Andy Bounds

What are your customers really buying?/buy on keyboard{{}}When I’m in London, I travel between meetings on the back of a motorbike taxi. I use them because the journey times are quicker and more predictable than my other options. I don’t choose them because “it’s a motorbike”.

Also, my company chose our IT service providers because they could free up our time; not because “we do IT”.

And we selected our accountant because he could help us grow our business; not because “he is an accountant”.

You see, when we buy things, we aren’t interested in the things. Instead, we’re interested in what they give us. Or, as I call it, the afters — why we’re better-off after buying.

Weirdly, we often don’t realise we want these afters. For example, I imagine you recently bought a newspaper, thinking you wanted a newspaper. You didn’t. You wanted the news. Glasses? Better sight. Toothpaste? Clean teeth.

Smart companies use afters to persuade us to buy. For instance, Kodak doesn’t sell by discussing their photographs; they talk about preserving our memories. Disney doesn’t sell by focusing on their cartoons. They talk about making our dreams come true.

So when you want people to buy-in to your messages, what do you focus on? Your ideas? Initiatives? Proposals? Research? Yourself?

Or, do you focus on why others will be better off afterwards? The time you save them. Or the costs. Or the hassle. The fact you reduce their stress, grow their business, help them look good to their boss… Now, those are great reasons to buy-in.

So, engage others instantly by beginning with their afters. This can be hard to do — after all, you are passionate about what you do. But I would never have chosen a motorbike taxi if some motorbike enthusiasts had spent ages telling me about their motorbikes.

People will never buy into your content unless their afters are crystal clear. So next time you’re looking for quick buy-in, start by explaining why the other person will be better off afterwards.

Andy Bounds is a communications expert, speaker and the author of The Snowball Effect: Communication Techniques to Make You Unstoppable. You can sign up for his free weekly tips here.

You can read more about Andy’s approach to sales here: No more fears — selling made easy

Posted in Sales | Tagged selling, sell, sales | 0 comments

Crafting the email

May 21, 2010 by Karen Purves

Emails are the lifeblood of your communications.

  • You want people to read your material and respond.
  • You want people to feel good about seeing an email from you in their inbox.
  • You want to give your readers a reason to open your email.

That is all your email has to do.

It doesn’t have to close the deal. It doesn’t have to take the payment. Leave that for your website to do.

Then your reader has the option whether to click on the link and take it further or just consume the information you have provided.

To test the sort of content that is right for you, call a couple of prospects or clients and give them the information you want to send in an email. If you find your hands going clammy at the thought, then perhaps your message is not right at this time.

People will buy when they are ready to do so. There is nothing you can do to get them to buy quicker or differently to the way they will do so. It is your job to understand how your prospects buy and map your communications accordingly. A couple of things will happen – less of your emails will be found in the spam box and the number of sales will increase.

This blog post by Karen Purves originally appeared at HaveMoreClients.com

Two ways to add to experiences through communication

April 29, 2010 by Robert Craven

To heighten an experience you can create expectations and/or you can condition the experience.

  • To heighten an experience can be fairly straightforward.  For instance, you tell the customer what to look for. 
    E.g. Wines2You, the wholesale organic wine importer, include tasting notes with their wines stating things like ‘notice the flavours of buttered toast, some say slightly burnt toast’.  Suddenly the client tunes in to these flavours and probably passes on this titbit of information to friends when drinking the wine.
  • To condition the experience you need to add a creative idea.  This adds to the experience, often in terms of romance or mystique.   
    E.g. Wines2You tasting notes go on to say how Keith, the owner of Wines2You, first met Enrique, the owner of the vineyard, early one scorching summer’s morning in the northernmost part of Spain, celebrating the birth of his first child in one of the sixteenth century caves at his smallholding…

It adds to the “sizzle and the steak”.

Robert Craven of The Directors' Centre

Syndicate content