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Blog posts tagged Social media

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Why Albert Einstein knew a thing or two about measuring social media

September 10, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

Why Albert Einstein knew a thing or two about measuring social media{{}}Albert Einstein said: “Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts”.

Einstein has hit the social media nail on the head. The benefits of social media can be both tangible and intangible and not every aspect of your social media success can be measured. So how can you ensure you’re getting a clear ROI — or “return on Involvement” in social media.

There are many ways to measure your social media success. Getting a positive mention from an industry expert or getting your content in front of key people can be invaluable. Social media gives you easy access to specific audiences so if you are using social media for business, the first thing you need to do is ensure you’re fishing in the right pond. There are many social media sites, all with different purposes and audiences; find out where your audience is lurking and then focus your efforts here.

But once you’ve got a social media strategy, how do you measure its effectiveness?

Set clear and realistic targets

Set clear objectives and realistic goals and understand why each is a measure of success. Targets could include: reaching a certain number of new followers, achieving lead conversions or re-tweets. If you’re hitting these then you’ll know your social activity is working, and if you’re not, look at where you’re focusing your efforts. Keep pushing yourself by gradually making these objectives harder to achieve and as your social media skills increase so will your business success. One measure to employ is by asking: “Where were we able to start this conversation that led to the sale?”.

Social media measuring tools

There are many social media management tools out there to enable you to monitor every aspect of your social activity. These include measuring your click-through stats, likes, re-tweets, follower growth and post shares:

  • Facebook’s metrics are great for showing you how successful your social media activity is.
  • Twitter search your company name — this allows you to monitor your Twitter reputation by bringing up news, pictures and tweets that your brand has been mentioned in. By adding the # before your name you can see all tweets that directly reference you.
  • Technorati will notify your brand when it has been mentioned in the blogosphere.
  • Monitor This is a little more technical but worth it. You can have it watch over 20 different search engine feeds and make an .opml file that you can put into your RSS Feeder to display any results.

Sites like Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, Sprout Social and Meltwater Buzz offer social media “dashboards” that allow you to post and monitor the success of all your posts, showing conversation volume and the sentiment of mentions. These platforms can also flag up all mentions of search queries you enter.

Saving time and money

Social media provides cost effective access to powerful marketing, networking and lead generation tools. It has truly levelled the playing field for small businesses but it’s essential to have a strategy. By measuring how much time and money your business has saved by using social media to achieve its goals faster, you can see a clear “return on involvement”. If you are spending hours on social media with very little to show for it, then you are doing something wrong. One quick and easy time saving exercise is to schedule “proactive” tweets and posts (without looking like a robot); then you can engage more “reactively” as required.

Analysing brand recognition

Social media is a great way for a business to raise brand awareness. Use monitor tools to search for your brand name. Monitoring your Twitter mentions allows you to see when and why people are talking about you.

Mentions by influencers

Positive mentions are difficult to measure; if you are being re-tweeted and discussed by industry experts then you know you’re “doing” social media right. This shows that you’re creating and sharing engaging content that others find useful. Ensure you set clear goals for who you would like to interact with online and if your content is being picked up by these people then this is a clear measurement of your social success.

Follower growth

After you post content about a specific subject, you may see your followers, likes and favourites increase. This is because people follow feeds and people who provide rich and interesting online content. If your followers/connections are constantly increasing and, in particular, you’re getting lots of new professionals in your sector, then your social media activity is clearly working. Keep posting engaging content — including your company blogs and news as well as third party content— to give people a reason to continue following you.

Better internal collaboration

Social media can foster better employee engagement and communication between departments. Businesses that use social media often have a better collaborative working environment as they reap the rewards of the cost and time efficiencies that social media can bring. And through better internal communications you will soon see better external communications.

Copyright © 2014 Emma Pauw, social media writer, We Talk Social.

The 11 deadly sins of social media

August 27, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

The 11 deadly sins of social media{{}}Recently we’ve seen some sinful uses of social media; from clueless users to pointless tweeters. Already this year we’ve witnessed an array of social media blunders, not to mention those who’ve been prosecuted for their comments on social media.

So why all the sinning? With social media use at an all time high and as competition increases between social businesses, people are stretching the social media boundaries to stand out online. Some businesses have lost sight of social media etiquette, business etiquette and common sense as they “borrow” content and spy on their competitors.

But businesses that abuse social media are only damaging their own reputations and jeopardising their business opportunities.

So what are the 11 social media sins?:

1. Forgetting that social media makes you omnipresent

Although you can delete posts, people can also screen grab and anything you post can remain in the social media realm forever. This is particularly relevant with Twitter — you can never be certain who is monitoring what you tweet. Never post anything on social media that you wouldn’t be happy for the whole world to see.

2. Not being consistent across social media platforms

Treat social media as one and be consistent across your social media profiles. Your social media profiles should not be competing for your attention, do not favour one over the other; you should post content consistently over all sites. But keep in mind though that each has its own rules and purposes.

Use Twitter to signpost, ensure LinkedIn is B2B focused, Facebook B2C and Google+ should be a mixture of the two. You may need to alter the language of your posts based on the target audience of that platform. Ensure that your presence is consistent and truly represents you. Your social media profiles are usually the first place people go to find out about you, if you’ve got a mismatched, jumbled and inconsistent presence, people will be less likely to trust you and what you post.

3. Not being vigilant about fakes and trolls

There are thousands of fake social media users posing as celebrities and everyday users, with many of these being controlled by internet trolls. These are people who trawl social media sites posting derogatory comments and abusing users and should be reported to the social networking site in which they are operating on. 

You must ensure that those influencers you follow are verified (have a little blue tick). If you’re an infamous user yourself, consider getting your own account verified.

4. Not minding your Ps and Qs

You need to be careful what you tweet, even on your personal social media profiles. If your employer is mentioned on your profile, they can be liable for any offensive comments you make through Vicarious Liability.

Mind your social media Ps & Qs, watch your language and do not swear — especially if you’re posting from your business account. Your tweets represent your brand so ensure they reflect your target market and avoid offending anyone with your language.

5. Taking a break from social media

There are proven best and worst times to post on social media and constantly broadcasting brand messages can be a waste of time. Check out the best times to post and ensure your posting is targeted.

Mix up scheduled tweets with timely posts throughout the week so you’ll create a great balance for your social media profiles and save yourself a lot of time.

6. Sharing personal information

Social media is not the place to air your dirty laundry and you will undoubtedly regret doing this so don’t share your personal information, family disputes or private matters.

Do not mix your personal life with your business handles; ensure you create a different personal account to keep up to date with friends. Already this year we’ve seen a number of cases involving people being fired, and in some cases prosecuted, for what they’ve said on social media. Again, don’t post anything that you wouldn’t want the world to see — including friends, family, colleagues and employers.

7. Deleting negative comments

Most of us have received negative or abusive comments on social media at some time. Don’t delete these comments, instead reply to them promptly (not necessarily immediately) and appropriately (step back, compose yourself, don’t reply in anger, deal with this in the same manner as you would through any other form of contact) to show you are dealing with this.

This is particularly true when it comes to social customer service; Twitter is now the first place many of us go to complain and if your company is brushing these comments under the carpet and removing them from your feed then this shows you in a terrible light. Show respect when replying and only use humour if appropriate.

So, don’t kill comments (unless truly offensive, in which case report and block); start dealing with them confidently.  Ultimately, you will be judged on the way with you deal with it.

8. Not being faithful to your connections

Don’t insult or mock people via social media; instead treat all your connections with respect. Ensure you get the tone of voice right, as well as the content you share — never position yourself online as something you are not.

Treat others as you would like to be treated yourself. Forge new relationships, share content and that way your will gain respect, support and recognition.

9. Copying content

Social media has made it harder than ever for individuals to keep a track of their comments, posts and articles; and it’s now easier than ever for people to steal your content. Don’t steal other people’s tweets, arguments and opinions — it’s wrong.

We all know that social media is great for getting content ideas and inspiration, but if you are to use someone else’s articles, don’t present them as your own and reference them correctly. Social media content can still be copyrighted and you may find yourself in trouble if you present ripped off content as your own.

10. Lying

Many people think social media gives you anonymity but this isn’t always the case. Social media posts and comments are traceable so never use social media to slander people or businesses.

If you have a problem with a business or a brand, make sure you bring this, politely, to their attention and do not use social media as a way to broadcast your hate towards them. If you’re a business, don’t lie about other companies or mock them on Twitter.

Ensure that you have correct training and policies in place to monitor what your staff post and who has access to your accounts.  After all, social media is an extension of your existing communications channels.

11. Jealousy

Love what your competitor is doing on social media? Well, don’t just sit back green with envy, go and do it yourself. Social media has removed boundaries that were traditionally the realms of big brand, big budget names.

Social media has provided a glass wall into other businesses and If you like something they’re doing, then think about doing something similar yourself. Not only has it allowed you to monitor competitors, social media has also allowed you to keep a track of your business targets, giving you an easy way to communicate and network with them.

© Emma Pauw, social media writer, We Talk Social.

Are you having one-sided conversations on Twitter?

August 19, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

Are you having one-sided conversations on Twitter?{{}}Social media platforms such as Twitter give brands a free and invaluable way to connect with clients (both current and potential), spread brand warmth, monitor competitors, manage customer service, gain customer insights and drive website traffic — what’s not to love?

Yet, many brands are jumping feet first into the social media realm without understanding the basics; in particular, how to post content. This may seem like a no-brainer to some, yet many brands still don’t understand the fundamental rules of social media. Yes, social media is integral to your brand, but going out all guns blazing with no planning or strategy may do more harm than good.

And what’s the biggest faux-pas of all? It’s using social media channels to broadcast rather than engage.

Beware broadcasting

If used in moderation, broadcast messages on social media can be effective. You can flag up new website content including blogs, news and articles. And you can attract more fans and followers by positioning yourself as an industry expert.

Yet, this must be done in moderation. If you continuously broadcast marketing messages via your social sites, people will soon switch off. Mix these messages with engaging third party content, network with customers and work to build strong lasting relationships with your followers. Social media is a long game but over time you will see results.

You wouldn’t train your in-store staff to constantly shout out brand messages in an attempt to sell to customers — apart from looking unprofessional, it would drive people away. So why do brands do this on social? The best sales people get to know their customers, they engage them in conversations, find out what makes them tick and then provide a solution to match their needs. The same should go for social media.

Twitter tactics

A report from Brandwatch shows that 25% of top brands continue to use Twitter for broadcasting purposes only. If you’re constantly broadcasting marketing messages, your content is without context, no trust is built and ultimately no sales. This can also make your brand look uncreative; your social media sites are supposed to show the human face of your organisation, to show your personality. If you’re only pushing brand messages, your business looks dull and uninspiring.

The real value comes from engaging your followers in two-way conversations, interacting with them and showing them that you care. Over the years, many brands have created a huge sense of brand warmth via their humorous and engaging social media posts; and their messages are retweeted, spreading their brand messages much further than those brands who broadcast. So come on guys, get some personality.

Are your posts falling on deaf ears?

We all know the saying; if a tree falls in a forest, does it make a sound? Well, the same goes for social; it’s all well and good endlessly posting but if you’re not engaging your followers then these posts will fall on deaf ears. If you’re constantly pushing out messages, people will soon switch off. Instead start engaging in conversations, joining in with the chatter and building up a strong sense of brand warmth and rapport with your followers.

Copyright © 2014 Emma Pauw, social media writer, We Talk Social.

How to find time for social media

August 13, 2014 by Sara Drawwater

How to find time for social media{{}}If content creation and social media is an important aspect of your marketing, you’ll know how much time it can take. This is probably the most common problem that SMEs face. The vision may be there but the ability to make it happen with limited resources is incredibly challenging.

Social media won't work if you don't allocate enough people and time resources to it. Here are six tips to help you manage content creation and social media effectively based on my own experiences running two businesses and attempting to manage three websites, four blogs and more than ten social media channels!

  1. Delegate some of your existing roles. If you are the person managing and/or delivering content creation and social media then you may need to restructure your role. Be realistic and understand that this work will take time. For example, I have recently delegated email enquiries (30 minutes a day), book-keeping (two hours a week) and meeting transcriptions (three hours a week). That equates to 7.5 hours a week or a whole day that I can now apply to this work. Delegating is a real discipline. You need to spot areas of work that someone else can do, select the right person to help and equip them to be successful by ensuring they have the knowledge and time to deliver. It will take time to reassign the work but after that, you'll have more time. If you don't have a team in-house, look at how virtual assistants can help you.
  2. Get your team on side. If you are a sole trader, then you are the team! But if you have a team, it’s vital that social media is not a one-man crusade. Get the rest of your staff on side and create a social business that understands the value of building relationships and social selling through attraction marketing. You will also need to assign clear responsibility with strict time scales and train staff in content creation and social media delivery.
  3. Plan your delivery. Do not underestimate the value of planning. Know your business goals and how this applies to content creation and social media. Understand the needs of your audience and create content accordingly. Create a content calendar that defines what content needs to be created, by whom and by when.
  4. Get into a routine. Figure out how you and your team work best. A fixed routine is best. Some people say they need to be in a creative mood, but what if that mood never comes? We have a habit of pushing back the work we fear or don't want to do. So try to do key tasks at specific times.
  5. Use social media management tools. Scheduling your social media posts will help you manage your time. Explore tools like Buffer, HootsuiteTweetdeck and others. But remember we are talking about social media — so as well as scheduling your posts, check in regularly to respond to people and join other conversations. You can also use social media management tools to listen and inspire your next piece of content. My preference is Buffer for scheduling and Hootsuite for listening.
  6. Get external help. If you've put all the above into place and you are still struggling to turn the vision into reality then it's probably time to look at getting external help. You'll need to explore the pros and cons of an apprentice, a new member of staff or a marketing and communications consultant.

Sara Drawwater is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and runs her own creative consultancy, Something Beckons.

How to build a brand with words

June 23, 2014 by Marketing Donut contributor

Copywriting{{}}Most of us are pretty clear about the importance of design when brand building, but we are often less sure about which words to choose to bring our brands to life.

But every time you put pen to paper you either engage or disengage your customers. Words matter and brands that tell their stories as well as showing them win hands down. Successful brands like Apple and Volkswagen match the words to the visuals to create a strong voice.

Content marketing and social media

Twitter, instant messaging, texts, online chat — they’re all proof of the power of words. How many times have we heard about people forming long distance relationships online, with only words at their disposal?

And think of how much information we find on the web before purchasing just about anything nowadays. Reviews, descriptions, listings and websites all contribute to our decisions to buy.

So how do you build a brand with words?

  • One way to establish the right tone of voice it to think of your brand as a person — what sort of conversations are they having?
  • Capture your audience’s attention immediately — you have about three seconds for online content and not much longer for offline, so assess your content as if it’s the first time you’ve seen it.
  • Don’t overcomplicate your message — differentiate between things you find interesting and your genuine USPs that will convince customers to buy.
  • Focus on benefits not features. Features have their place but nobody was ever driven to buy a widget because it was only 1cm wide. They were driven to buy it because its slim width is a key advantage.
  • Edit, edit and edit. Revisit and edit again — get the picture? There will be times when your message is muffled by excess wordage. So lose the waffle. Less is more.

Finally, assess your writing capabilities honestly and if writing isn’t your thing, get help. You can keep costs down by doing as much groundwork as possible, putting all the content together in one document. Most copywriters charge by the hour.

Sara Ruber is the director of creative agency Become.

The SME guide to social customer service

June 12, 2014 by Marc Duke

The SME guide to social customer service/ Unlike red stamp with thumb down{{}}I recently went to the Social Customer Service Summit run by Our Social Times. The event was attended by major brands and technology providers in the social customer service space and looked at all aspects of social customer service in relation to larger organisations.

But if you are a small business or an entrepreneur is this relevant to you?

Let’s assume you have a social media strategy in place. No doubt you have read plenty of hints and tips about social media etiquette; how Facebook and Twitter differ from LinkedIn; how Pinterest, Instagram and Vine will transform your business; and you are up to speed with what you need put on YouTube.

But you may still be wondering if social customer service really is relevant to you and your business. Here are some facts to consider:

  • Radio 4 recently devoted 30 minutes discussing the issue of complaining on Twitter;
  • 53% of people who engage with a brand on Twitter expect a response within one hour or less (Social Media Today);
  • By 2020, 90% of customer service will be done via social media (Gartner);
  • 82% of customers stop doing business with a brand after bad service (Harris Interactive).

So what needs to be done to make social customer service in your business a reality?

Well, it depends on who your customers are and how they behave. As a small business, the chances are you know exactly who they are, whether they are active on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and you also know how they like to interact with you. Some will prefer email, others will prefer to use the phone or they may — lucky them — get the chance to talk to you face-to-face.

Controlling the customer experience

As a small business you can control exactly what sort of customer experience your employees give your customers, and the fact that you treat your customers in such a personalised way is something they value as much as you.

The challenge comes when your business starts to grow. At present you probably use Twitter and Facebook to get the message out and hope that people hear what you have to say. The question of how to deal with customers who complain on Facebook or Twitter probably isn’t front of mind at the moment.

But as your business grows it has to be.

So think ahead to avoid disappointment and consider the following:

  • People. Make sure your employees know your code of conduct on Twitter, Facebook and other social media as soon as they join. You might have to provide training before letting people loose online as you would on the phones or when responding to email.
  • Process. Make sure you have a series of steps in place to deal with a complaint logged on Facebook or Twitter. Don’t ignore it — a person with 3000 Twitter followers who posts something negative equals 3000 complaints.
  • Place. Social media is a public domain. Any good business owner that has a disgruntled customer in their shop will look to deal with the situation in a private and discreet manner. The rules are exactly the same online.
  • Personality. Ultimately, social is an amazing platform that lets you and your business show its personality to the world. Don’t go all corporate — people are expressing their views and feelings, so respond in kind.
  • Plan. Try to plan for a crisis. As the saying goes, we don’t plan to fail but we will if we fail to plan.

Marc Duke is a marketing consultant.

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