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Blog posts in Internet marketing

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How to nail social media in just ten minutes a day

April 23, 2014 by Luan Wise

How to nail social media in just ten minutes a day/Retro alarm clock{{}}One of the most frequently asked questions I hear during my “What’s the point?” series of social media talks is: “How do you find the time to do all this?”

My initial answer is, I’m abnormal. Don’t expect to do what I do — I’m not an average social media user.

My daily routine involves switching off my alarm and checking Facebook, Sky News, LinkedIn and Twitter on my smartphone. I have the same routine before I go to sleep. A couple of times a week, I’ll also look at Google+ and Pinterest. I might also look at Instagram at weekends.

I check in several times during the day — depending on where I am and what I’m doing — usually mid-morning and just after lunch, as my newsfeeds contain the most new content at these times.

But if I was a “normal” social media user, what would I recommend?

You need a plan. You need to know what you want to achieve and identify the best tools to enable you to achieve it. It’s far better to use two or three tools really well than to attempt them all.

First, spend time planning your content. Using a calendar to plan evergreen content frees you up to focus on the real-time stuff.

Free tools such as TweetDeck, HootSuite or Buffer can help you schedule and manage your activity. Check out Nutshell Mail for a summary via email, and Crowdbooster for detailed analytics.

It only takes ten minutes…

If you spend time planning, you can maintain an active and effective social media presence in just ten minutes a day.

This gives you time to check your newsfeed or timeline, share timely content, and engage with connections or followers — say thanks, like or add a comment.

Social media needs to become a habit, just as email use became a habit 10+ years ago. Technology is here to make our lives easier. It’s not fundamentally changing what we do — just how we do it.

It takes just 21 days to form a habit. In three weeks, social networking can become a part of your daily life.

How often should I post?

Research suggests the following posting frequencies work best:

Blogging: weekly

Facebook: three to four updates each week

Twitter: four to five times a day

Pinterest: weekly

Google+: two to three times a day

LinkedIn: two to three status updates each week

Once or twice a week you should check out who has viewed your profile on LinkedIn and participate in a group discussion. Regular participation will ensure you soon have a manageable habit to acquire news and information, and to engage in meaningful conversations.

If your timelines are filled with information that’s not of value, you need to reset your filters. Don’t be afraid to “unlike” and “unfollow”. You can use Twitter lists to organise the accounts you follow into manageable groups, then select which lists you view and when. Your LinkedIn home page allows you to customise the updates you see regularly.

Start forming your social media habit today — the chances are you’ll wonder how you managed without it.

Luan Wise is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and is a freelance marketing consultant.

What next for social media? Five big predictions

April 22, 2014 by Guest Blogger

What next for social media? Five big predictions/Social Media word and Icon cloud{{}}Some common themes came out of the recent New York social media show in February. Here are my top five predictions based on what I learned there:

Quality not quantity

You can reach too many people. Surely the holy grail of social media or any form of digital marketing is as wide a reach as possible, right? No, says Jonah Peretti, ceo and co-founder of Buzzfeed.

Peretti’s message was that if your content is in front of the wrong people it could actually be damaging. No-one wants a “so what?” response. This boils down to audience research and targeting content. He also stressed the importance of taking time to get your content right — the quizzes on Buzzfeed that are so popular right now actually evolved over six years of experimentation and tweaking.

Quality content is also fundamental to the trend-setting Gen Y audience, the 20-somethings who embrace new platforms and bring them to the fore. Markham Nolan, managing editor of the Gen Y global social news network Vocativ.com, pointed out that one of the biggest misconceptions about this demographic is that they prefer “shallow or simple content”.

Vanity metrics

A much-used phrase throughout the week — vanity metrics describes the idea of getting as many Facebook likes, Twitter followers or +1s as possible. For many Facebook social users, there’s a competition to see who can get the most friends. It’s the same with Twitter followers. And it is the same story for many brands. But do you really know who 90% of those people are?

The focus has shifted and it comes back to quality not quantity. The emphasis is now on top quality content targeted at the right audience who will engage with it, the aim being to build a lasting relationship that’s going to translate into brand advocacy or loyalty.

Get optimised for mobile

If your site is not mobile-optimised, then you are missing out on a serious amount of traffic generated not only by unique visits but social media shares too.

Adam Ostrow, chief strategy officer at Mashable, revealed that 45% of the site’s users view it on mobile. “And that number is growing. The article page is the new homepage — 75-80% of our traffic comes from articles that have been shared on social.”

Video, video, video

According to HubSpot, posts with the word “video” in them are shared 30% more on Facebook than posts that do not. And this is set to increase. Buzzfeed has just set up its own production studio in Los Angeles to make its own entertainment videos — where one goes, others will follow.

Dark sharing

Jonah Peretti suggested that messaging apps would be the future of social media as early adopters who once flocked to Facebook and other more visible platforms get sick of sharing their lives openly and opt instead for private messaging, or “dark sharing” between closed groups. Mark Zuckerberg’s acquisition of WhatsApp suggests that he thinks so too.

Angela Everitt is writing on behalf of content marketing agency, Southerly.

LinkedIn bids farewell to 'products and services'

April 16, 2014 by Guest Blogger

LinkedIn bids farewell to 'products and services'/Time for Change on transparent wipe board{{}}As of 14 April, LinkedIn has removed its products and services feature from Company Pages. With well over one million pages being lost — complete with the wording and recommendations that went with them — businesses are wondering how they can promote their products and services on LinkedIn now.

The Products and Services tab may have disappeared but businesses now have two options to promote their products and services on LinkedIn:

  • Share information via company updates on your main company page;
  • Create a new Showcase Page.

What’s a Showcase Page I hear you ask…

These pages are a relatively new feature and essentially work as an extension of your Company Page with the aim of highlighting a brand or business and the products and services that you offer. The pages consist of a cover photo, a quick description of what the page is showcasing, a sample list of page followers and, of course, the actual page updates.

The main difference, however, is that people are able to use this page to follow aspects of your business they find most interesting. LinkedIn says: “Showcase Pages allow you to extend your Company Page presence by creating a dedicated page for prominent products and services. A Showcase Page should be used for building long-term relationships with members who want to follow specific aspects of your business, and not for short-term marketing campaigns.”

As the majority of space on this page is taken up by page updates, LinkedIn says you must: “ensure that you have a plan for maintaining an active presence” before you set up a Showcase Page. If you have little to say, you’ll soon find your Showcase Page looking bleak and barren.

So what’s the fuss about?

Posting real-time company updates about your products and services on your main Company Page is a sensible suggestion, but these can be quickly disappear from people’s newsfeeds as new content arrives and the same will happen on your Company Page.

Many firms prefer a more permanent place to highlight products and services. And the products and services section had been well-used by businesses, with some even paying external consultants to create these sections for them.  

So how did LinkedIn justify this decision to remove all the hard-earned product and services recommendations and wording? It said: “we do this to ensure that we’re creating a platform where companies can deliver timely, engaging content to our members. Sometimes, this means we need to remove a feature to focus on areas of the product that most benefit both companies and our members.”

Before jumping feet first into a new Showcase Page, ensure that you have enough content and create a plan. In the meantime, posting regular company updates will help but in the long term, this is less than ideal. With regards to your product recommendations, if you’re a page administrator, you can download these to ensure they are not lost forever. You can also request a copy of them from LinkedIn.

Social networking sites are always evolving and should never be solely relied on to showcase your business. So it’s vital that your company website remains the principal shop window for your products and services.

Emma Pauw is social media writer at We Talk Social.

How to drive traffic with fresh and enticing web content

April 15, 2014 by Guest Blogger

How to drive traffic with fresh and enticing web content/Hand with Time For New Content{{}}Keeping your website updated is important for encouraging traffic that brings in business. If your team has got in the habit of adding to the business website regularly, you’re on the right track. A website that’s continually updated will pull better results from search engines and it demonstrates to customers that your business is doing well.

It’s also worth trying to come up with “evergreen” content. Evergreen content doesn’t become outdated or irrelevant. Rather, it always reads and appears as relevant whether it’s viewed the day you upload it or three years later. While all content that’s fresh and enticing doesn’t have to be evergreen, this kind of long-life content is very useful.

Here are the six “musts do’s” of fresh web content

1. Blog weekly

 Blog about new products, share a tutorial with your subscribers or write about what’s going on in your business. It’s not necessary to blog daily, but add one or two blog posts per week to keep visitors coming back for more.

2. Incorporate a news section

What are people talking about in your industry? Is there an event coming up or a new product launch? Fresh content includes news that’s current. To keep it evergreen, use dates instead of time frames. For example, say “on May 29th, 2014” instead of “in a few weeks”.

3. Include client testimonials

Current client testimonials show potential customers that your business is thriving and clients are happy with your services or products. Seek testimonials from satisfied customers, add them to a specific page and intersperse them amongst relevant product or service information. One of the best ways to convert a would-be customer is to provide them with previous customer reviews.

4. Get to know your audience

Know your customers and subscribers to provide content that is relevant and enticing. If you understand your demographics, you’ll be able to focus on your niche market to cater to the specific needs, personalities and interests of your customer base.

5. Provide updates

Update your readers on past stories or news items, especially if they elicited a large number of “likes” or shares. There’s nothing wrong with flying on the coat-tails of a previously popular post if you have a fresh update to add.

6. Link content to current events

Tap into the interest in current events — national or local — through your blog; and promote products and services that customers would find useful in relation to those events.

The foundation of fresh web content

All the fresh content tips in the world won’t amount to anything if they’re being applied to a website that is clunky to navigate and unpleasant to look at. Before adding a blog to your business website or hiring a professional writer to create content, ensure that your website is attractive to viewers and easy to use. Avoid cramming too much onto one page or overwhelming the viewer’s senses with music or flashing pictures. Keep your website clean so viewers can easily focus on the fresh content you’ve created for them.

Mary Ylisela is part of the writing team at TouchpointDigital.co.uk.

Five ways to improve your direct marketing in the social sphere

April 10, 2014 by John Keating

Five ways to improve your direct marketing in the social sphere/Social Networking concept{{}}You may think that that social media and direct marketing are two completely different beasts, but I beg to differ.

Engaging with an individual via social media is about as “direct” as it gets in direct marketing. Direct marketing aims to connect marketers to customers and social media allows us to do this in real time with real conversations.

As we all know, selling is increasingly a two-way process with your potential customers more often than not being the instigator of a relationship. No longer do we have the preacher and congregation scenario whereby sellers preach their wares to a voiceless audience. 

Our customers now have a voice and they are using it. 

The key to success is to harness the power of this voice using social media to help spread positive news and reacting quickly to any negative conversations to convert the naysayers.

So how can small businesses improve direct marketing using social media?

  1. Firstly, do your marketing communications enable easy social sharing? If not, why not? Make sure that you include relevant sharing buttons such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+ and so on. This is a no-brainer; let your brand champions do some of the hard work by allowing them to share and like your content.
  2. The social sphere offers an almost unlimited potential audience, so make the most of it. If you build an online following, real time interaction will allow you to forge lasting relationships as you can appeal to buyers as a human being and not a faceless business. You can then take them offline (don’t forget to ask permission) and into a lead nurturing programme.
  3. Integrate social into your marketing campaigns by using offer-based incentives via Facebook, Twitter and so on. This will allow you to find out where your audience hangs out online and enable you to engage with them further on the platform of their choice.
  4. Use your social platforms to try out new content approaches and then, when you know what works, you can add the most successful content to your email marketing.
  5. Powerful marketing campaigns using Facebook can be created where offline or purchased marketing data can be matched to Facebook to offer up ads to individuals you already have intelligence on or even to your existing customers. This can work for both B2B and B2C audiences by creating a human to human approach. The possibilities are endless — you could place a thank you advert as a nice gesture, for example.

So there you have it, social media and direct marketing do not have to be quarrelling siblings; they can work together in perfect harmony to increase the influence and effectiveness of your campaigns.

John Keating is an expert contributor to Marketing Donut and director at Databroker.

Five ways to create a brilliant blog

April 07, 2014 by Guest Blogger

Five ways to create a brilliant blog/Rubber stamp make Blog word{{}}Do you want a hard-working blog that attracts lots of readers in your sector? Read on:

1. Find your niche

Whether you’re setting out to produce an industry blog or a personal one, you need to make sure it’s on a subject you’re passionate about. It sounds obvious but if you don’t know a lot about the subject you’re blogging on then as a resource it has limited value. As I’m in the B2B PR industry I knew what my peers would find valuable and this insight informed the categories on my blog and it has helped to attract guest posts from some high profile people in the industry.

2. Don’t be afraid to be controversial

Don’t be afraid of putting your opinions forward and exploring topics that conventional industry publications would rather avoid — these topics will more often than not prove to be the most popular with your readership. One of the most popular series we’ve produced was a frank assessment of the state of the UK’s PR industry body, the PRCA. We asked whether it offered smaller agencies good value and whether it was principally a lead generation tool for bigger agencies. The blog received a lot of attention and the PRCA ended up engaging with us online and that debate certainly benefitted our readers.

3. Stay calm and carry on blogging

Launching a blog can be soul destroying. You can go for weeks with very little traffic and it can be hard to gain traction as a newbie in an already competitive industry. If you don’t get the 10,000 readers you were hoping for in your first week, keep at it! Your readership will build gradually over time if you keep producing content that appeals. If you abandon your blog at the first sign that it’s not going to be easy, then expect to fail.

4. Spend a little bit of cash

While you may think the quality of your content will attract industry peers from far and wide, they do have to find it in the first place. The beauty of social PPC campaigns is that you can use networks like Facebook and Twitter to advertise to a specific audience at a very low cost. We spent no more than a few hundred pounds promoting our blog and were able to get it in front of the right audience quickly and cheaply.

5. Develop a basic understanding of SEO

If you want to build an engaged following then you need to understand what your target audience is searching for online. Get familiar with Google’s keyword tool to make sure that the content you’re producing on a regular basis contains the right search terms. Not only does this attract a relevant industry audience but it can also work as a lead generation tool.    

Heather Baker is the managing director of TopLine Communications and editor of the B2B PR Blog.

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