Courtesy navigation

A brief history of SEO - and why Google is doing us all a favour

A brief history of SEO - and why Google is doing us all a favour

November 25, 2013 by Guest Blogger

A brief history of SEO - and why Google is doing us all a favour/SEO sign inListen to this cry of anguish. It came from someone commenting at the end of a blog post about Penguin 2.0, which (as I will explain) was an update that Google made to its search ranking algorithm.

To paraphrase: "For eight years I have been trying to follow the twists and turns of what Google wants websites to do. Every time I finish making changes, Google changes the rules again. I am trying to make my ecommerce site successful, but I cannot. I have lost my life savings on this business. I am not going to bother changing after this. If Google moves the goalposts again after Penguin 2.0 they can go **** themselves."

That was in May. Later in the summer Google released the Hummingbird update, a change to the algorithm that was an absolute whopper.

While I completely sympathise with the person whose savings had run out, there is a positive aspect to the changes that Google endlessly makes.

Consider these changes over the last ten years, each one given a name rather like the way hurricanes are named:

2003: Florida update penalised websites that were stuffed with spammy key words.

2004: Brandy update penalised too many synonyms (eg wealthy is a synonym of rich).

2005: Bourbon update hit duplicate content; Big Daddy update hit low quality reciprocal links.

2009: Vince update rewarded news authorities and recognised brands.

2010: Mayday update rewarded specialised niche websites.

2011: Panda update tackled “content farm” websites full of SEO-based content. And as well as algorithms, Google used human testers to identify low quality content.

2012: Penguin update further penalised spammy links.

2013: Penguin 2.0 hit spammy links and other SEO deception activities even harder.

Yes, put simply, Google is trying to penalise the tricksters and reward those of us that provide good, honest, high quality content.

Now Hummingbird moves beyond looking at the mere words in a search; it attempts to understand the full meaning of the query, so it can then deliver search results to match. So you can expect websites that answer lots of questions to do well.

The poor guy who spent eight years losing his life savings on an ecommerce website will have known all along that Google would gradually improve its search techniques, but meanwhile he had to compete using the techniques that were delivering the best results that month. Alas there was no easy option for him, even with the benefit of hindsight.

We are now getting to a point where all of us can focus on content that meets the needs of the website user. The Donut websites have done this all along — because our revenue is not advertising-based and so we do not rely on high traffic figures. So ironically we have ended up with better traffic than sites that may have invested huge sums in SEO.

Rory MccGwire is the chief executive of Atom Content Publishing, publishers of the Donut websites.

Comments

Add a comment

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <p>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Links to specified hosts will have a rel="nofollow" added to them.

When you click 'Register' to create a new account, you accept our terms of service and privacy policy